Update on the Coming Currency Crisis: Re-Visiting the Dollar Milkshake Theory (w/ Brent Johnson)

Update on the Coming Currency Crisis: Re-Visiting the Dollar Milkshake Theory (w/ Brent Johnson)


BRENT JOHNSON: My name is Brent Johnson, I
am the CEO of Santiago Capital in San Francisco. The dollar milkshake theory is something I
coined about 18 months ago. Essentially what it is, is I believe that
the central banks over the last 10 years have created this milkshake of all these different
currencies, they’ve pushed liquidity into the global economy– yen, euros dollars pounds. For a long time, it was just circulating out
there but as of, I think 2016, we got into this divergent monetary policy where the US
started raising rates while the rest of the world was still mixing the milkshake. Raising the rates and having rates higher
on a relative basis to the rest of the world acts as a straw, which sucks capital into
the United States. I think that that has happened. I think that will continue to happen. I think that means positive, although, it’s
not going to be smooth, and there’s going to be times of great chaos along the way,
I think it’s positive for US asset prices. I think when I first came on and started talking
about it on Real Vision, it was around May or June of 2018, and since then, what we had,
we had a couple more rate hikes. Subsequently now, just in the last, 30 to
60 days now, we’ve had one rate cut with another expected one in the United States. I think what’s really, really interesting
about it is everybody in the various camps can, to a little extent, still say they’re
still in the game and their point of view is playing out. I had been calling for equity prices to go
higher, and they went higher in 2018. They had a huge sell off at the end of 2018. I got very aggressive at the end of December
and bought call options, because I believe the equity prices were going higher because
of this theory and we had a great run, back to the all-time highs now or near the all-time
highs as of middle of September, but that doesn’t mean that they’re going to bust out
right now. We might have another pullback, it would not
surprise me at all if we have another pullback before the end of the year, but ultimately,
I think, equity prices are going to go higher. The other thing that’s happened is bonds sold
off pretty aggressively in 2018. The yields on the 10-Year went above 3% in
the fall. We’ve seen that have a huge move back the
other way, rates have fallen, the 10-Year bonds around the world have rallied like crazy. We’ve got the US 10-Years are down back to–
I think it got to 1.5. Then now, it’s I think around 1.7. We had a huge rush back into Treasuries and
not just US Treasuries, but Treasuries around the world. We went from 8 trillion of negative yielding
bonds a year ago to $16 trillion of negative yielding bonds now, which is just unheard
of. It’s crazy. Then in the last couple weeks, that was done
on the fact that even if the Fed started to get dovish, and they were thinking that monetary
policy would be a factor– and it still will be but you’ve seen just in the last 10 days,
people are starting to push back on the negative rates trade and even some monetary authority
are saying we’re not sure that those negative rates are healthier or going to work. In the last 10 days, you’ve seen a big selloff
in sovereign bond yields. I think the negative yielding debt has gone
from $16 trillion back to $14 trillion or something like that. They’re crazy numbers. It’s a crazy time period, but I think, the
dollar bulls a year ago, me included said, we’re going to see a breakout in the dollar. It’s broken out a little bit, but we haven’t
had the runaway breakout, yet. The dollar bears have said it was going to
crash and it hasn’t really crashed, but it hasn’t really broken out yet either so they
still think that they’re in the right. It’s anybody’s game as to which way this is
going to go. Now, I have it obviously have a strong opinion. I have a strong belief in which way this is
ultimately going to go. We’re in that period where everybody can still
say they’re in the game and it’s going to be interesting how it all works out. Yeah. One of the things I think that’s interesting
is a lot of times, when people focus on the dollar, they look at the DXY. I talked about the DXY a lot too. The reason I talked about the DXY is it’s
heavily weighted to the yen and the euro and those are the two biggest competitors to the
dollar. The yuan, to a certain extent, people think
of it as a competitor but as far as the DXY, it’s a minor component. The fact is, is that the Euro has weakened
a little bit versus the dollar this year, and the yen has strengthened a little bit
versus the dollar this year. While the dollar– the DXY index is up a little
bit, 3%, 4%, or 5%, the broader view of the dollar is that it has broken out, if you look
at the Asian Dollar Index, it broke through a support of like a 20-year support line and
if you look at the dollar versus a number or basket of Asian currencies, the dollar
has clearly broken out. If you look at the dollar versus the GTN currencies,
other than the yen, and I think the Canadian dollar, all the GTN currencies are down, in
some cases dramatically versus the dollar. If you look at the Broad Trade Weighted Dollar
Index, it broke through the long term resistance and it has not clearly broken out. If you just focus on the majors, which is
the Euro, the yen and the dollar, not much is really going on, but if you step back and
you take a bigger view of the dollar versus a number of world currencies, the dollar is
clearly wreaking havoc. You’ve seen this in places like Argentina. Their currency is now down 60% versus the
dollar in the last couple of years. Their stock markets are in the same range,
same thing has happened to Turkey. Same thing has happened in Venezuela. This is I’ve talked before about the Highlander
example between the dollar and gold are like Connor McLeod and the Kurgan from the Highlander
movies. At the end, there can be only one and I think
gold will ultimately win that battle, but I think that battle is a few years down the
road. I think in the meantime, the dollar is going
to go around the world cutting off these other currencies’ heads. I think that’s what we’re starting to see. I think you’re going to see more of it going
forward. One of the big key issues to my overall thesis
is the demand for the dollar. Now, a lot of people will say that the world
is de-dollarizing, people don’t want to use the dollar anymore, or they don’t like that
the US has been acting from a bully pulpit and directing the world order and so they’re
going to de-dollarize, they’re going to leave the dollar, and that’s going to decrease demand. The real world, the reality is, is that over
the last 10 years, emerging markets and international entities outside the United States have issued
$12 trillion to $13 trillion of– I’m sorry, of dollar denominated debt. The demand for dollars for that debt that
they have issued, if they had the same interest rate as the average outstanding US Treasury,
which is 2.3%, then that would mean that these entities on an annual basis just to service
the debt need $300 to $400 billion of dollars just to pay the service fee on the debt that
they’ve issued. The bigger issue is that they’ve taken out
this debt over the last 10 years. In 2007, or ’08, it was around $4 trillion
or $5 trillion, $6 trillion, now, it’s $12 trillion, $13 trillion, but we’re 10 years
down, and so a lot of these loans are coming due. If you look at the payment schedule for maturities
of a lot of these dollar issued debt by these emerging markets, the maturities are 2019,
2020, ’21 and ’22, so the next three or four years, they not only need the dollars to service
the debt, they need the principal payment to pay it back off. I will often hear well, they’ll just default. They’re tired of the dollar, they’re just
going to default on the debt. That sounds like a great theory, and if they
did that, that would decrease demand for the dollar, but the issue is that because all
money is loaned into existence, if you default on debt, the supply of money crashes even
further and faster than the supply, or the supply of money crashes even further and faster
than the demand crashes. If people start defaulting, not only will
the price of the dollar rise, because supply is just collapsing, but those countries who
have now defaulted, they’re going have even more trouble raising external capital, because
nobody will want to loan them money again if they’ve just defaulted on a recent loan. If they start raising money in a non -US dollar,
then do you think the US is just going to say, “Okay, no problem?” No, I think the US will then say, “Well, we’re
not transacting with you, not in dollars.” Now, all of a sudden– or they’ll put new
tariffs on them, or they’ll say, “We’re not going to do business with you, because you
just defaulted on our banks.” Now, they’re locked out of the biggest consumer
market in the world when they’re already having financial troubles. This idea that they can just walk away from
the dollar and have no negative consequences is, in my opinion, just it’s not reality. I think one of the knock-on effects of my
thesis of the dollar getting stronger is that it creates chaos in the rest of the world. It creates deflationary events in our world. It creates economic pressure, downward pressure
on the rest of the world. As a result, I think that sends capital to
the United States– for no other reasons, just a safe haven bid. Then it creates this vicious loop where it
pushes US asset prices higher, it pushes the US dollar higher, which creates even more
pressure outside, which leads to even more flows coming. What that does is it increases the demand
for US priced assets. You can see this being– and where there’s
demand, the supply will be added. You’ve seen this in the corporate bond market
in the last, I think in the last two months, they’ve issued $75 billion to $100 billion
in new corporate issuance, and that’s demand for dollars. Those are issued in dollars. There’s great demand for dollar denominated
debt. If the market wasn’t there, then they wouldn’t
be supplying it. I think that that’s further evidence that
this is happening. I also have said that there will come a point
where overseas investors will not just go to our Treasuries or our fixed income, but
they will increasingly start to see US equities as a safe haven, or a way to seek some alpha. I’ve used the example before, of I think,
a year ago, I talked about if I’m an Italian pension fund manager, and I’m looking at how
to allocate assets, and I have a choice between buying an Italian bank or a US Bank, I’m buying
a US Bank, or, if I’m buying a European credit, or a European corporate versus the US corporate,
I think they’ll increasingly start to allocate to US corporates. In the last month, we’ve seen the largest
sovereign wealth fund in the world, which is the Central Bank of Norway, has recommended
that they decrease their allocation to Europe and move those funds to US and including US
equities. A lot of this stuff is taking longer than
many of us think it will, but you can see it moving in that direction. I think as we move forward, we’re going to
see even more of that type of stuff that the Central Bank of Norway is already considering
coming to the US. I think to a certain extent, this is already
happening. It’s why our assets or our US equity markets
are near their all-time highs. Here’s an interesting thing to do. Take a look at the European equity market,
look at it in euro terms, it doesn’t look horrible, but look at it in dollar terms,
it looks really bad. Then flip it around and look at the Dow. Look at the Dow in dollar terms, and it looks
okay. Not amazing, but looks okay. Look at the Dow euro terms, it looks really
good. It’s clearly broken out. If you’re a euro investor, and you’re looking
to allocate and you use charts as part of your analysis, and you’re looking to allocate
to the DAX or do you allocate to the Dow? It’s pretty simple. It’s a pretty simple answer, in my opinion. Yeah. Back in 2016, I started talking about the
dollar getting stronger. Even then, I said, at some point, we will
get into a point where the dollar and gold will rise together. In the last year, we’ve seen that. A year ago, gold was around 1200. Now, it’s around 1500. They’ve had hell of a run. Over that time period, the dollar’s gotten
a little bit stronger as well. I think that ultimately, there is nothing
more bullish for gold than a strong dollar. Now, if you’re a nondollar based investor,
if you’re denominated in euros, or yen, or Australian dollars, or pounds, or whatever
it is, pesos, I think you can– you should have and still can back up the truck on gold. I’m not convinced that we’re breaking. Now, we’ve had a hell of a run in even dollar
terms this year, which now you see gold rising and all currencies, and you’re seeing the
dollar and gold rise together. I’m not yet convinced that it’s for real in
dollar terms. It might be and if it is, that’s fine, but
it won’t surprise me if gold pulls back in dollar terms in the short term. Ultimately, what I think will happen is the
dollar will get so much stronger that it will literally break the global monetary system. There’s really nothing more bullish than gold
than the dismantling of the monetary order and the traditional monetary system. I don’t think we’re there yet. I think that a lot more pain needs to come,
but when that happens, I think gold will be one of the biggest beneficiaries of that. One of the obvious impacts from the central
banks around the world is not just the monetary stimulus that they provided, but they’ve been
buying a lot of gold over the last several years as well. You see the Central Bank of Russia, the Central
Bank of China, a lot of times those are quoted, but even smaller countries around the world
have been buying gold. I think they buy gold for two reasons. One, they want to diversify their reserves. They’ve already got a lot of dollar reserves. They don’t need to have it all in dollars. I think the other thing is that they know
that if they have gold, they to a certain extent have a seat at the table if there’s
ever a renegotiation of the monetary system. The other reason that you buy gold is– the
reason that central banks buy gold is also the same reason that individuals buy gold. You buy gold to use in a crisis, when things
really get bad, that’s your insurance policy, and countries are not immune to really bad
times. If you look around the world over the last
six or seven years, gold and non-dollar terms has done pretty well and it’s near its all-time
highs in several currencies. Now, it’s not quite back to its all-time high
in dollars, it’s been edging up, but it’s still not back to its all-time high in dollars. If you look in euros, if you look in Australian
dollars, if you look in Canadian dollars, if you look in the yen, it’s still okay. Gold is doing exactly what it’s always supposed
to do for the non-dollar investor. Now, the interesting thing that I find with
the central banks that are accumulating gold is nobody wants to cash in their insurance
policy. If you get into a disaster, that’s what it’s
for. Over the last two or three years, you’ve seen
some countries get into the Dire Straits, have some disasters, and they’ve needed to
cash that insurance policy in. You look at Venezuela, they’ve been selling
their gold for dollars to fund their government. In Turkey, they had to sell gold to finance
some of their trade and some of the government when the US put sanctions on them. I won’t be surprised if that happens. I’m not saying that all the central banks
are going to go out and sell their gold, but as countries come under pressure, that will
be one of the options that they have. I think some of them, whether they like it
or not, will be forced to use their gold as a means to fund their governments. Now, if we have a monetary disaster in the
next six weeks, or the next six days, and there’s not that– I think there will be a
progression before the monetary system resets. If it just resets right away, then they’ve
got their gold, they don’t need to sell it along the way. If this monetary crisis plays out over a two
or three-year period, rather than a two or three-week period, or two or three-month period,
as the knock on effects happen, I think some of these central banks will be able to force
to sell their gold. Here’s something just happened to– I think
it was July, maybe it was August, there had been this central bank sales agreement between
the central bank– between all the central banks and the Bureau of International Settlements
which was a negotiated gold sales. You couldn’t sell without being part of this
gold coordinated selling program because they didn’t want to have uncoordinated gold sales. Well, that’s been removed. Now, a lot of people in the gold world have
said this is bullish, they’re removing the sales agreements, they’re no longer cooperating,
everybody’s going in to buy. This agreement never kept them from buying
to begin with, this was a gold sales agreement. It wasn’t a gold buying agreement. Now, why are they all of a sudden removing
a sales agreement if it didn’t prevent them from buying to begin with? Well, I think they might have to sell some
of their gold. I think they removed it because they know
that some of them might have to sell their gold. Now, this is a great advantage for some people. Russia, if they want to buy more gold, well,
if Turkey has to sell it, maybe Russia buys it. Some of them will see it as an opportunity,
but some of them are going to have to sell their insurance policy, I believe. It’ll be interesting to see how this all plays
out. Ultimately, this is extremely bullish for
gold in the long term, but I think you got to realize that just because it’s bullish
inevitably, it doesn’t mean it’s bullish imminently. I think if we haven’t learned that over the
last six years, we haven’t learned anything. Yeah. Going back to China, I’ve been outspoken that
China is in more trouble than many people think that they are. I continue to think that’s the case. You’ve seen a dorsal starting to bubble up
in Hong Kong. What a lot of people don’t realize is the
troubles in Hong Kong are not unrelated to the troubles in China. There’s a friction there. I think both the Hong Kong monetary authority
and the Chinese central bank are both under pressure from their dollar funding needs. I think that will as the dollar gets stronger,
that increasingly plays into the troubles that they’re going to have. At the end of the day, the limit that China
has, you can’t have an independent monetary policy and open capital account and a fixed
currency. That’s why they don’t– they have a fixed
currency because they don’t have an open capital account. If they want to internationalize, they’re
not going to be able to maintain that peg. I think when that peg goes, I think it goes
hard and it goes fast. I don’t see how China gets out of this without
their currency depreciating remarkably. Now, whether it’s forced upon them or whether
they decided to do it on their own, I don’t know. One of the biggest trades we have on right
now is we’re short the Hong Kong dollar. We think the peg is going to break. We think when that happens, that’s enormously
bullish for the dollar. It has a number of knock on effects around
the world. We think that that will be incredibly deflationary
for others that have dollar funding needs. One of the other biggest trades we have is
long Canadian Bankers’ Acceptance Notes. Now, many people probably never even heard
of Canadian Bankers’ Acceptance Notes. It’s very similar to Eurodollar market. If you bought Eurodollar calls, because you
thought interest rates were going to go down, so you buy the calls, because it’s a bet that
they’re going to cut interest rates and people like Raoul and some other people around the
world, John Burbank have talked about this great Eurodollar trade that they made a great
call a year ago. This is the same play, but it’s in a smaller
market and how many people even know exists. I think there’s like five people in the world
that trade these things. We put a big trade on last week, and we’ve
been putting it on over the summer, we put more on last week. We think that the Central Bank of Canada is
one of the few central banks in the world that is not easing right now. Their policy rate is 1.75%. If you look around the world, Australia has
cut, the ECB has cut, even the Fed has cut, Japan’s got easy money, Poland’s got easy
money, Brazil’s got easy money, New Zealand’s cut– there’s this easy bias around the world
that central banks believe that they’re going to need to ease monetary policy. The Bank of Canada has so far resisted and
we think the idea that Canada can stand alone against the rest of the world is just wrong. We think that they’re going to be forced to
cut. If they’re forced to cut, these Canadian Bankers’
Acceptance Notes will appreciate, but right now, they’re factored in one cut in the next
I think, 18 months in Canada. We think that it’s possible that they have
to cut dramatically more than that. When that happens, the straight on the BACs,
the Canadian Bankers’ Acceptance Notes, like, I don’t want be dramatic, but just the math
of these things that if we get it right, we can make three or four times our money and
it’s possible we’ll make 10 times our money on that trade. Again, that doesn’t mean there’s not risk
involved. Of course, you don’t get those types of potential
returns without taking risk but we think it’s a risk reward that’s worth taking and we have
a high degree of certainty that it will pay off. The thing I like about these types of trades
is if you’re wrong, you don’t lose that much. If I’m wrong, and Canada doesn’t go into a
recession, or doesn’t have any deflationary pressures, and the world economy improves,
well, then the other parts of the portfolio will do really well. If we’re right, and they do, and they have
to cut, you make an asymmetric return on this, where you can literally make three, five,
10 times your money, and the risk reward necessitates you doing this trade. As I said, at a conference recently, there’s
some trades that can be done, but they don’t need to be done. Then some trades are so good, they must be
done. I think this is a trade– the trade for the
strong dollar, because the trades are so asymmetric, I think they’re trades that make must be done. Essentially, the way I see is I think the
global economy is slowing. I think we’re headed towards a global recession. You’re starting to see it outside the United
States, I think that will continue. I think it will eventually hit the United
States. Before it hits United States, I think the
flow of capital from around the world is going to come to the United States. I think that flow of capital is going to delay
our hitting the wall, while everybody else does hit the wall. As that capital comes into the United States,
I think that increases demand for dollar based assets. I think corporates, US government and other
dollar based entities will issue dollar debt. I think it will be purchased. I think that will also find its way into the
US equity market. I think it’s very possible we have a repeat
of last year, whereas we had a big selloff in late 2018. I think it’s very possible we have that happen
again in Q4 of 2019. I’m glad I was aggressive on equities at the
beginning of the year so I don’t have to be as aggressive now. If we get another selloff like that in Q4,
I think I’ll be aggressive buying equities later this year, the same way I was last year,
because I don’t think we’ve seen the high in the equity markets yet. I think the flow of capital to the United
States trumps everything else. No pun intended, Trump has put policies in
place that will increase, I believe, the desire for US assets. As that happens, I think we will have a blow
off top in the equity market, I think we’re going much higher. 30,000 or 35,000 on the Dow would not shock
me at all and it’s potentially, we go even higher than that. I’m going to say this, again, I say it all
the time. This is a story that ends very, very badly. I’m not the Pollyanna that’s saying everything’s
fine, buy US assets and put your head in the sand. I just think that this is the inevitable outcome
of a global debt supercycle and the end of the monetary system. I think it ends via dollar strength. I think before it all ends, we get a supernova
upward swing in the dollar, dollar based assets. Then there’s going to be periods of time along
this route that are really, really scary. It’s not going to be easy. I wish it was, but it’s just not going to
be. I liken it to the Super Bowl and you listen,
you either want to be in the Super Bowl or you don’t and you either love it or you don’t
and I got to say it’s scary but I love it. It’s like Tom Brady leading his team down
the field with three minutes left and they’re behind by five, kicking a field goal ain’t
going to get it done. You got to get into the end zone. I don’t know if I’m going to get it right. It’s very possible I don’t get it all right,
but if I get a little bit right, I think we’re going to do pretty good.

98 Comments

  • Real Vision Finance

    December 8, 2019

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    Reply
  • Rob Bird

    December 8, 2019

    3 months old

    Reply
  • All Things Prophetic

    December 8, 2019

    Thanks from us here @ All Things Prophetic

    Reply
  • Brian Crane

    December 8, 2019

    If the dollar goes higher the banks, companies and countries that borrowed money (issued bonds and received cheap dollars) will have to pay expensive dollars back both for the coupon and the principle…they may not be able to buy dollars then (with whatever they have in reserves and securities) to either pay the coupon or roll over the debt (Greece!!)…another global crisis!

    Reply
  • Jess Meister

    December 8, 2019

    Back in December 2018 this guy did NOT see rate cuts coming.

    Reply
  • Ben Anderson

    December 8, 2019

    On Demand Liquidity (X)

    Reply
  • Adrian Segura

    December 8, 2019

    He owns peter a gold coin . And boy was he wrong about gold and the dollar

    Reply
  • BANKERRR MUSIC

    December 8, 2019

    Oh my gosh this is awesome this is totally dope I remember when I first watched this like a year ago I'm glad this is an updated review

    Reply
  • pete b

    December 8, 2019

    what does he mean when he says "the end of the monetary system"?

    Reply
  • Mark M

    December 8, 2019

    Normalcy Bias.

    Reply
  • Jack Black

    December 8, 2019

    There is only a reason out of two why someone will tell you their trade – either he wants to improve his image, that someone followed it and make fortune and he gets more client OR he starts to doubt his thesis, and his audience then goes and buy after listening and he could exit lossless. Btw, it is impossible Bank Of Canada is not going to lower interest rate but I just hear about the market

    Reply
  • Freddy Krueger

    December 8, 2019

    i feel like drinking a chocolate milkshake

    Reply
  • XRP Future

    December 8, 2019

    I’m happy that this guy is capitalising on the robbery of the working and middle classes.

    Reply
  • Safet Hamzagic

    December 8, 2019

    I bought gazprom the other day..jesus muhamed david horse cow help me with my investment

    Reply
  • KurJan&Urbano

    December 8, 2019

    Yes yes… I agree with him. USD will go much higher on capital flight.

    Then it will blow off…

    Just hope I can pick that moment and dump all my USD into Renminbi and Singapore Dollars.

    Reply
  • bowtiebuy2

    December 8, 2019

    Wish he had addressed what is going on in the US repo market since 17 Sept…..Fed is very involve with providing liquidity …..QE4ever…..and what effect (if any) on his milkshake theory. Seems to me that with the Fed financing our trillion $ deficit/year for years to come, that would weaken the dollar.

    Reply
  • peter wright

    December 8, 2019

    ask him were the missing 21 trillion is

    Reply
  • Gee DoubleU

    December 8, 2019

    I hear magical thinking.

    Reply
  • 66Block

    December 8, 2019

    Old Chinese curse: "May you live in interesting times". Looking for boring.

    Reply
  • Rof Lhard

    December 8, 2019

    Real interest rates are negative in the US now. Deficits being monetized. Gold looks more attractive on that basis..

    Reply
  • Rof Lhard

    December 8, 2019

    I think Brent has forgotten that Gold is cutting heads off whilst the USD is cutting off heads. And let's not forget that cryptos can cut off heads also.

    Reply
  • Rick S

    December 8, 2019

    Canada has already sold all its gold under Jihad Justin. Canada has NO cushion when the financial crisis strikes, Canada has NO insurance policy.

    Reply
  • Magic Mark

    December 8, 2019

    The man is sharp and very well informed.

    Reply
  • Enjin3

    December 8, 2019

    There are plenty of countries who would love for the USD to not be the world's reserve currency (and gleefully default on imperialist US debt). They could potentially tell the US where to stick their debt & fight among themselves for a new reserve currency. Russia wants that to be gold, while China I'm sure would be beside itself if it could make it an intensely invasive cryptocurrency.

    Reply
  • Christian Kruse

    December 8, 2019

    Great interview!
    See you on Twitter (Missiondweller)

    Reply
  • Jonathan Brandes

    December 8, 2019

    he not only said what he believes……but why he thinks so……..

    Reply
  • Mr. Smith

    December 8, 2019

    Fantastic interview. One of the true macro minds. Deep thought which I bet plays out. You're right on oil stocks, /true value play. I love gold , but in a year or so, just ran up don't chase. Stick with protein (Ag) and oil. Tech overbought and wrong quad. Stagflation….
    But then $USD is headed why higher like he says. Listen to a master……

    Reply
  • Johnny Schmegma

    December 8, 2019

    high interest rates is either the smartest idea ever or, more liketly, the dumbest idea ever

    Reply
  • Johnny Schmegma

    December 8, 2019

    Problem is high interest rates ain't free

    Reply
  • Nasdaq trader

    December 8, 2019

    I want a milkshake!

    Reply
  • Yann Chevrier-Foundy

    December 8, 2019

    he lost me at US equities = safe haven. Valuations will matter eventually

    Reply
  • muffinman1

    December 8, 2019

    US isn't going to be the biggest consumer market for much longer, China is set to overtake. That is, if they can keep it together as well.

    Reply
  • El Sols

    December 8, 2019

    Oy! Brent Johnson scares me.

    Reply
  • zamraii

    December 8, 2019

    Thank you for revisiting this subject. When I first heard about this theory over a year ago I immediately felt there’s something to it. And suprisingly to most people USD indeed started to rise together with gold. Now waiting to see if the rest of the theory comes true. There’s a reason Trump pushes FED to lower IR all the time and wants weaker dollar. Stronger dollar is a machine of mass destruction and the last victim of this would be US.

    Reply
  • Christianity Boxing Mafia

    December 8, 2019

    Load up on Gold/Silver and Trust Trump he wouldn't have taken the job unless he had a master plan!!

    Reply
  • 00rphb

    December 8, 2019

    An economic panic usually starts at the periphery, but it very quickly moves into the centre.
    It takes at most six months from a crisis to emerge in an emerging market, till it have affected the heart of the financial system in America. That dosn't give people a lot of time to move and it is better to be in gold now, before the storm, because ultimately the US will be hit the hardest.

    Reply
  • Josh

    December 8, 2019

    It is shocking that the CAD/USD pairing isn’t 1.50/1.00

    Reply
  • Makki9119

    December 8, 2019

    This guy is wrong

    Reply
  • Scott K

    December 8, 2019

    Another Martin Armstrong parrot… He came up with this theory a couple years ago, which is an IDENTICAL copy of what Armstrong has been saying for >5years.

    Reply
  • Tob Ias

    December 8, 2019

    7:40 why would the dollar supply go down if foreign dollar-denominated debt defaults?

    Reply
  • Maqbool Fida

    December 8, 2019

    What explains the low inflation given all this liquidity? It just goes to show the price of components that make up inflation is stable…as the entire supply chain is well below its limits and there is no major increase in price if the volumes increase…so all the new money has not flowed into the lower end of the job and commodity market…. all the growth in money supply has gone into financial assets (equities, bonds, real estate)…

    Reply
  • Shalom Dunn

    December 8, 2019

    The stock market would have already crashed if the FED did not do QE.

    Reply
  • LazaPolola Polo

    December 8, 2019

    The guest is making analysis on a fake economy….! Plus, the US is not the largest consumer economy in the world. For goodness sake China has over 1 billion consumers alone combined with India that's over 2 billion getting close to 3 billion. Countries "as we speak" are dropping the dollar. This guy acts like the dollar will be the reserve currency forever. I guess he forgot about Great Britain, Spain, Portugal, and others who at one time had the reserve currency. It's over bud….get real…! Gold rises when the dollar drops or when the dollar is corrected to its worthless state. Gold is "real money" the dollar is not….! Countries are buying gold because they see the economic collapse on its way and the "death of the dollar."

    Reply
  • Zach M

    December 8, 2019

    He makes great points, but I'm thinking that SDRs will drag down the USD while propping up other currencies

    Reply
  • Bud Holly

    December 8, 2019

    THE US DOLLAR IS A SAFE HAVEN

    Reply
  • Josh

    December 8, 2019

    The drinking is taking it’s toll

    Reply
  • Free man

    December 8, 2019

    A September interview is not very helpful – the dxy is stable and a bit down over this period. Don't know what it means that we've crept down to 97+ from 99+ in this timeframe…I guess it only means no one can predict the future…or it's just short term noise…We'll see…

    Reply
  • Sa Ard Fetner

    December 8, 2019

    Excellent plan. Action speaks louder than words.

    Reply
  • Alfred Lear

    December 8, 2019

    Looks like a ponzi scheme entering it's endgame

    Reply
  • TheCanMan Can Since 1990

    December 8, 2019

    Now I'm starting to think the accumulation of gold is the tinder that starts global conflict
    not the propaganda we've been fed to prevent it or limit it
    Interested to see if any academics have looked into this esp around recent history Ww1_2
    Amazing if we could see this on a chart I can't believe never heard anyone else mention this

    Reply
  • WEARE WAVES

    December 8, 2019

    Thank you Brent, for providing more pieces of the puzzle to help make sense of the situation. *(lol, have you given anyone a 1oz Gold Maple Leaf coin lately?)

    Reply
  • BlindHurricane5

    December 8, 2019

    I like that Canadian bankers acceptance notes trade… does anyone know a ticker or instrument? (eg. do I need to buy this at a private Canadian bank or the Bank of Canada?)

    Reply
  • vrmkk

    December 8, 2019

    The Dollar is already dead
    > Instex
    > Bitcoin / Ripple
    > SPFS
    > Oil exchange in different currencies
    > China alternative is coming

    Reply
  • Canada2016

    December 8, 2019

    Hey Brent, i hope you paid Peter Schiff his gold coin.

    Reply
  • Gadsden

    December 8, 2019

    Lol, Peter told you they were going to lower rates

    Reply
  • Ferg Ferguson

    December 8, 2019

    Why does warren buffet think gold is like the climate scam?….richest guy in the world knows it won’t be practical for the average joe…can you buy a loaf of bread with a gold bar.?…😳 other than that nugget I think mr.johnson is right on about everything.

    Reply
  • Daniel Wozniak

    December 8, 2019

    Hmm, people keep looking at what is going on as if it were routine… they may be surprised.

    Reply
  • Ai Em

    December 8, 2019

    What will happen to american exports if the dollar rises tho? The rest of the world will turn to china and other countries for cheaper goods?

    Reply
  • Danny

    December 8, 2019

    Brent looks like Steve Irwin

    Reply
  • R R

    December 8, 2019

    So what he said is measure all fiat currencies against gold. Only gold is real money

    Reply
  • Don Duncan

    December 8, 2019

    Why would anyone invest with guaranteed negative results, e.g., negative interest?

    Reply
  • Coin Connector

    December 8, 2019

    XRP – GOLD- QFS

    Reply
  • Paul Peele

    December 8, 2019

    does anyone know how to buy in to this opportunity he discusses he calls ; the canadian bankers acceptance notes. it sounds like an interesting trade but google never heard of it?

    Reply
  • Jo Hannes

    December 8, 2019

    Sounds like he doesn’t know what’s going to happen at all. “Theories.”

    Reply
  • shoey977

    December 8, 2019

    I don't understand how he is bullish on the market yet he concedes that interest rates need to drop further? I get that lower interest rates are bullish for the market but if the economy gets so bad that further and drastic cuts are needed in places like Canada and the US then at some point we need to see some negative GDP prints and at some point the market will have to go down as a result?

    Reply
  • chip midges

    December 8, 2019

    Would love to hear someone actually speak about what this is all going to do to the real estate market in terms of supply, demand and product. Everyone talks about the global markets and the death of the dollar, but nothing about the real life, day to day outcome for normal folks as it relates to real estate and just general financing.

    Reply
  • Joseph Carter

    December 8, 2019

    Can you tell me why the dollar is dropping in value against the Thai Baht???? Anyone?

    Reply
  • Freddy Krueger

    December 8, 2019

    Either Martin Armstrong has repeated verbatim what Brent Johnson said or vice-versa.
    I could have sworn Martin Armstrong said the exact same thing in a video podcast.
    Who's copying whom, anyone have any idea?

    Reply
  • Stock Trendz

    December 8, 2019

    Brent Johnson vs Peter schiff real vision debate time

    Reply
  • Michel Fortier

    December 8, 2019

    Smart guy and in total agreement with his thesis!

    Reply
  • Maximus

    December 8, 2019

    The USD is the best of a bad bunch. The Australian economy is made up from primarily two things, foreign household debt and resources to China and India neither are sustainable. I have already been moving to the US dollar and equities for the medium term.

    Reply
  • Alex G

    December 8, 2019

    If the currency markets are left uninterrupted, the dollar will probably remain strong or very strong until the very last moment before its possible (not inevitable) collapse in the distant future, exactly like described in the video.

    Today the supporters of a soft dollar (like Trump) cannot understand the magnitude of the US government debts (internal/external) and private debts and the US double deficits dynamics compared to 10 years ago. They also overestimate the dollars reserve currency status and are flirting with dangerous ideas like the MMT or intervening policies to devalue the US currency.

    The main danger today is that one such policy is enacted and directly or indirectly devalues the dollar. This will most probably lead prematurely to a sudden loss of confidence to the reserve currency (even if there are few alternatives) with disastrous consequences, taking everybody by surprise. Let's not forget what the Chinese say : "be aware of what you wish for"!

    Reply
  • Victor Guillory

    December 9, 2019

    People's lives are the superbowl? Nobles thought that before the French revolution!

    Reply
  • Mister Freeze

    December 9, 2019

    What I like about Bret Johnson is he tells it like it is and not how it should be. Gold is going down and the dollar is going up.

    Reply
  • user136002

    December 9, 2019

    If and when it does crash the global monetary system, it'll be interesting to see what happens with cryptocurrencies. Gold isn't practical in the modern age.

    Reply
  • QFriend

    December 9, 2019

    What about Bitcoin?

    Reply
  • Marc Andersson

    December 9, 2019

    Love Brent's ideas!

    Reply
  • sciflyer67

    December 9, 2019

    Amazing what unlimited Monopoly money can do to the financial system. If people would only realize that it has ever decreasing value and no backing. As long as the Fed keeps interest rates slightly above the rest of the major sovereign countries, they will still buy our bonds, and as long as they know the Fed will keep lowering rates, they can buy bonds and flip them for profit in the not so distant future. Meanwhile, companies and pension funds go bankrupt.

    Reply
  • sarcasmo57

    December 9, 2019

    Oh man. I thought there was going to be actual milkshakes.

    Reply
  • Simon Esposito

    December 9, 2019

    Does this imply that lots more debt is going to be piled on US consumers and households, and then onsold to people demanding US-dollar assets (through even more creative investment instruments than ever before)? If so, it definitely seems like we're at the tail end of yet another record-setting cycle of "pump-and-dump" economics.

    Reply
  • magic

    December 9, 2019

    It is all a poker game and that is why the ordinary people who suffers the most because of it they will come with pitchforks and axes one day to reset the whole thing anew.

    Reply
  • magic

    December 9, 2019

    Pound is up against the dollar

    Reply
  • e153624bmw

    December 9, 2019

    Keep stacking physical gold and silver bullion while it is still on sale and you can still purchase and get it with no counterparty risk!LOL!

    Reply
  • Adam Wiseman

    December 9, 2019

    Yeah it helps when they print a billion new dollars every day.

    Reply
  • YV

    December 9, 2019

    Exactly the same thing happened with London property prices in Arab Spring. Lots of money outside looking for save havens. That cash goes to US$assets (or eg London £property). Imagine the rich in Hong Kong right now….. multiply that out as more Hong Kong's happen. But in the end GLD wins….but don't hold your breath.

    Reply
  • Batman

    December 9, 2019

    October 9, 2019 USDX was up to 99.12
    as of December 9, 2019 USDX is 97.61

    Since this aired, USDX has dropped significantly

    Reply
  • Ian Balmer

    December 9, 2019

    There is a game

    Played out in Riemannian space, a complex, multidimensional field

    In which noise and signals echo

    In which sufficient signals must be found

    Processed, washed clean of noise

    Without washing out the signals

    The goal

    Do do what this dude does!

    Reply
  • Batman

    December 9, 2019

    Why does he think the fed will let the dollar strengthen when they are saying they want to keep inflation greater than 2%?

    Reply
  • Robert Hakker

    December 9, 2019

    Fundamentally and technically the markets look like me being followed by a cop just about ready to flip on the lights. The foreign banking system is breaking down, Euroland is stirring, a tremor forthcometh (no idea how to spell that or where it came from.)

    Reply
  • Ken Powers

    December 9, 2019

    "OOOOOOOOOOOOOIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII" Intro.

    Reply
  • Soy Doomer Low IQ

    December 9, 2019

    I don't understand why countries would hold their money in the dollar.

    Reply
  • Brian Ogden

    December 10, 2019

    Just someone selling gold/fear, move along

    Reply
  • Be Volkisch

    December 10, 2019

    Gibberish

    Reply
  • poncho 467

    December 10, 2019

    Positive is negative in my working class view!

    Reply
  • ammaad1972

    December 10, 2019

    My milkshakes bring all the boys to the the yard…..

    Reply
  • B W

    December 10, 2019

    Maybe but why is the USD buying less and less its for its own People??? Why was a pickup 9K in 1980 and 50K in 2019????

    Reply
  • Samuel Forsyth

    December 10, 2019

    loose access to the worlds largest consumer market? instead of being debt surfs in other words? how is that a bad thing?

    Reply
  • J Dub

    December 11, 2019

    Nice tip of the cap to Trump.

    Reply

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