Learn about British money, new and old! £££

Learn about British money, new and old! £££


Hi. I’m Gill at engVid, and today’s lesson we’re
looking at British money, the UK currency. Okay? And we’re going to be looking at the
present day currency, the notes and coins; and then in the second part of the lesson,
we’ll be looking at the older currency, which we had sometime in the past
which is a bit different. Okay. So, just looking briefly at the present day.
I’ll be showing you in a minute some actual notes and coins. So, these are the main numbers
of notes and coins, the pounds, and the pennies. Okay? And just to explain: The “penny” is the
singular, and there are two plural versions: “pennies” and “pence”. So, you can talk about
20 pence, 50 pence, or 50 pennies. Most people say “pence” when they’re giving the figure.
10 pence, five… Five pence, two pence, and then obviously one penny or one p. Sometimes
people just say: “P”, just the letter “p”. 50p, 20p. So, we use that as well. Okay, so
let’s have a look at some of the actual notes and coins. Okay, so here are some examples of the notes
and the coins. And starting at the top… We don’t have a 50-pound note, unfortunately,
but here is a 20-pound note in a nice mauve colour. They all have the Queen’s head on
one side, Queen Elizabeth II. On the other side, there’s a portrait of a famous person who’s
made some big contribution to the national life. So, we’ve got here Adam Smith, the economist,
going back to the 18th century. Okay, so that’s a 20-pound note. Next one, the 10-pound note. Again, the Queen’s
head. Now, there’s a slang term for the 10-pound note, which is a “tenner”, t, e, double-n, e,r,
“tenner”, okay. So, turning this one over, we have Charles Darwin, the scientist.
Okay. 19th century. And then moving on to the 5-pound note, and the
slang term for this is a “fiver”, f-i-v-e-r, “fiver”. And there’s the Queen again, and on
the back we have a woman this time. A token woman, Elizabeth Fry, who was a prison
reformer in the early 19th century. Okay, so that’s a fiver. Okay. And then… Oh, moving down to here, this
is… There is a 2-pound coin that’s bigger than this one but the same colour, 2-pound
coin. This is a 1-pound coin, and the slang term for that is a “quid”, q-u-i-d. Okay. Then
half of a pound is the 50, 50-pence piece. And this has this distinctive edge; little,
flat edges to it. Okay. And on the back, this is the back of the coin, Britannia, the sort of
female figure who represents Britain, Britannia. Okay. And so that’s 50p. Moving on to the 20p piece. Okay, the Queen’s
head on the front and another design on the back. That also has little, flat edges. Right.
We don’t have a 10p, but that’s slightly bigger than these 5ps, and has a circular edge. So
these are 5ps, a 2-pence piece or a 2p, and finally, 1p, one pence or one penny. They
used to be a half… Half penny, but they… They were taken out of the currency a few
years ago because they were so worthless, really. Okay, so that’s the current currency,
and let’s just go back now and have a look at a few more slang
terms for money. Okay, so we’ve just looked at the slang terms
for the notes: “tenner”, “fiver”, and “quid”. And then there are a few other terms: “ready
money” or “readies”, that’s, you know, cash. “Cash” is another useful term. It’s not a
slang term, but people say they would like to be paid in cash, or: “Do you have the cash?”
So this is the “ready money”, “readies”, rather than paying by credit card, or debit card,
or cheque. Okay. “Folding stuff”, that’s the paper notes. It folds up, so
it’s called the folding stuff. There are two terms to do with food: “bread”
and “dough”. The dough is what you put in the oven, and the bread is what you take out.
“Bread” and “dough”, that’s also a word for money. “Dosh”, “loot”, “lolly”, they’re all
sort of quite comical, humorous terms for… For money as well. Okay, so now we’ll
move on to look at the older currency. Okay, so now let’s have a look at the older
currency before 1971. And the reason I’m showing this-you may be wondering-is because if you’re reading
old books, old novels, like by Charles Dickens, and novelists like that, Jane Austen –
some of these coins that we no longer use might be mentioned, like the “shilling” in
particular. The shilling. Maybe “half crown”, a “florin”, the “guinea”. So, I’ll just run
quickly through these, and explain that we had to have this decimalisation because we
were joining the European community and we needed to have a simpler currency, because all
the other European countries had a currency based on units of 10 and 100. So, at this time, before 1971, we had 240
pennies in a pound, not 100 pennies. We had a shilling, which came between the penny and the
pound, so there were 12 pennies in a shilling, and 20 shillings in a pound. Okay? We had
a coin called a half crown, which I’ll be showing you in a minute, which was worth two
shillings and six pence, so that’s two and a half shillings. A florin coin, worth two
shillings. This line here is how the shilling was shown, like that. We had a 10-shilling note, so that was worth
half a pound. And also we had a 1-pound note, whereas now we have a 1-pound coin. And the
smaller coins: six pence, three pence, one penny, a half penny. And long before this…
This was no longer used in the 70s, but a quarter of a penny called a farthing, and
I’ll be showing you one of those. There was also a guinea, this word could come up if
you’re reading old books, which was worth one pound plus one shilling, i.e. 21 shillings,
and that was quite an elite kind of coin that was for sort of expensive dress shops and for
men’s suits. They were priced in guineas, rather than pounds, and it just meant the
shop got more money from people, so it was a bit of a trick, really. Okay, so let’s have a look,
then, at the actual coins. Okay, so just to
show you what some of these coins look like. This is the half
crown, two shillings and six pence. This is the florin, worth two shillings. This is the
shilling. That’s the shilling, worth 12 pennies. This is the six pence, six pennies, half a
shilling. These… These are three… Worth three pennies each. And this was the more
recent one. This was a much older one, little silver, three-penny pieces. Okay. These are
the penny, which is quite big. This is the ha’penny, half penny. And this is the
farthing, worth a quarter of a penny. Okay, so I hope you found that interesting.
A little historical information that might be useful for you if you’re reading older
literature. And just to mention, the present currency, as I said, is the pound. We don’t
belong… Although we’re part of Europe, the European Union, we don’t have the euro currency.
Most of the other European countries do, but in the UK we are not part of the euro currency,
and I think most people don’t want to be. We want to keep our pound currency, so let’s
hope we do. So, I hope that’s been interesting, and if you’d like to do
the quiz on this topic, please go to the website,
www.engvid.com and do the quiz. And if you’d like to subscribe to my
YouTube channel, that would be great. And hope to see you again soon.
Okay? Bye for now.

100 Comments

  • Niko2012

    May 25, 2017

    Zlotys

    Reply
  • ольга цытович

    June 5, 2017

    Thank you Jill for your way of teaching- clear and exact!

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    June 17, 2017

    but in Scotland and NI they have 100 pounds

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    June 17, 2017

    but i heard a lot 50 p than pence

    Reply
  • emily moran

    June 18, 2017

    this is so helpful!! I will be heading to London this week 🙂

    Reply
  • Jacey Burton

    July 10, 2017

    The slang word for £20 is "score".

    Reply
  • Jacey Burton

    July 10, 2017

    The variety of sterling used in Guernsey & Jersey retains the £1 note.

    Reply
  • Matt Jones

    July 15, 2017

    I like this

    Reply
  • Combat Chrome

    August 6, 2017

    For tenner and fiver can u just say 10 pounds and 5 pounds

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    August 6, 2017

    What are crown, half crown, sovereign, florin, farthing, sixpence, threepeny, penny, haypenny, schilling, Guinea

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    August 6, 2017

    And in Scotland and northern ireland have £100 and also Scotland still use a quid note

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    August 6, 2017

    How to add a half crown and florin and a schilling?

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    August 6, 2017

    Guinea is made of gold and the last mint of guinea was on reign of King George the Sixth the father of Queen Elizabeth II

    Reply
  • Angel Fun girls.

    August 23, 2017

    You are inpormet

    Reply
  • pattystomper1

    August 27, 2017

    I'm interested in learning more about the pre- 1971 currency, such as the half crown, tuppence, shilling, etc. Certains movies, like Mary Poppins and My Fair Lady use those terms, and I was curious about their value.
    Nobody has posted any clear comparisons to U.S. money, so maybe you could describe what you could buy (at that time) with each coin?
    For example, a haircut in the U.S. in 1970 was Five Dollars. A loaf of bread was a quarter (25 cents). A man's sport coat cost 30 dollars. And an average car cost around 4000 dollars.
    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
  • King Ephraim

    September 29, 2017

    Wow! I'll get ripped off if I went there! That's a lot too remember. Need practice.

    Reply
  • Michael Dougfir

    October 4, 2017

    Another success!
    You answered all my questions. Many thanks.

    Reply
  • Sarah

    October 8, 2017

    so is pence the same thing as saying cents? like 5 cents, 10 cents?

    Reply
  • Lily Medaries

    October 9, 2017

    Hello. From Louisiana and enjoyed your video. Thank you.

    Reply
  • Lily Medaries

    October 9, 2017

    I enjoy Hollyoaks. Always wondered the terms they use when speaking about money. And how much they'll need for whatever they need it for.

    Reply
  • Jeremiah Benavides

    October 13, 2017

    Thank you very much.

    Reply
  • Australian Citizen

    October 13, 2017

    Nice lady!

    Reply
  • macdz

    October 15, 2017

    I'd would be delighted if I could hear some British history. That would be great 🙂

    Reply
  • manaf shaibu

    November 10, 2017

    thanks you

    Reply
  • amy patry

    November 13, 2017

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR VIDEOS!! would we have a video about prepositions with relative pronouns in relative clauses?? pleaseeee

    Reply
  • BISWAJIT MANDAL

    November 30, 2017

    Special delivery my winners united Kimdom 2017 selected but no send my money why? please report thanks good night

    Reply
  • Ekaterina Okhrimchuk

    December 7, 2017

    Very very interesting! Thanks!

    Reply
  • Vespertine Volta

    December 11, 2017

    'Token woman'. Did you not notice the woman on the front of every piece of sterling?

    Reply
  • Leon Hard

    December 26, 2017

    Hi Gill, I'd love to receive lessons about british english business expressions thankee

    Reply
  • Oopsie Doopsie

    December 26, 2017

    I love this video

    Reply
  • Emma Brewin

    December 31, 2017

    Penny's are average American and Canadian 1 cent coin pennies aren't British there American and Canadian and 100 💯 pennies makes a dollar 💵 not a British pound 💷 because pennies aren't British

    Reply
  • djcarbines

    January 5, 2018

    And the old imperial measurement and no computers are probably levels of arithmetic were better then.

    Reply
  • The Majestic Bull Dog

    January 7, 2018

    Im british and i struggle with money and i randomly just looked this up

    Reply
  • Joe Wings

    January 15, 2018

    I have always wanted to know why the Brits avoid the letter "R" when speaking?

    Reply
  • runforit420

    January 23, 2018

    What a fantastic video – well explained!

    Reply
  • Emma Brewin

    January 28, 2018

    Yeah you're very correct because if you're in European countries you would need euros 💶 because the euros 💶are European currency 💴 and although the U.K. 🇬🇧 is in Europe it isn't a European country that uses the euro 💶so although other European countries use the euros 💶 the U.K. 🇬🇧 doesn't they like too use their British pounds 💷 and keep them inside of Britain 🇬🇧

    Reply
  • Gabor Szabados

    February 1, 2018

    Well, the UK is actually still a member of the EU. It remains so until at least 30 March 2019. But you never know when it comes to Britain and their intentions…

    Reply
  • AlexGW

    February 18, 2018

    Here in 2018, I have seven quid on my table which ain't worth naught! Old coins and a fiver! Probably the crappiest experience of finding money in a coat when I found that note last month!

    Reply
  • Muhammad Joshua

    March 2, 2018

    How often do you use pennies? What could I buy with those?

    Reply
  • Fabian Carpena

    March 4, 2018

    Thanks Gill!!!

    Reply
  • Anna Olivia

    March 4, 2018

    Thank you
    My boyfriend lives in England and I really try my best to under stand him
    But on another note this was really helpful :D!

    Reply
  • Marine For Life

    March 26, 2018

    I'm from the U.S and it's very interesting to me how different and similar our currency is with the U.K

    Reply
  • someguy23475

    April 5, 2018

    Gill, since you lived using both currencies, do you prefer the new pence or the old £sd system?

    Reply
  • joker

    April 7, 2018

    M'kay

    Reply
  • ganimed1976

    April 12, 2018

    So 4 crowns or 8 half crowns are 20 Shillings or one pound? Is that right?

    Reply
  • Linn Hitchen

    April 19, 2018

    Thank you so much for clearing it all up

    Reply
  • Pixel Arts

    May 13, 2018

    What do you mean a note,that's not a note!!

    Reply
  • Fremen Warrior

    May 28, 2018

    Your currency system before 1971 was messed up. Extremely messed up.

    Reply
  • Salvatore Escoti

    June 4, 2018

    The currency sign for the pound is £, which is usually written with a single cross-bar (as on sterling bank notes), though a version with a double cross-bar (₤) is also sometimes seen. This symbol derives from medieval Latin documents; the Roman words libra, solidus, and denarius (£sd) referred to pounds, shillings and pence[21] in the British pre-decimal (duodecimal) currency system and the black-letter "L" was the abbreviation for libra, the basic Roman unit of weight. And the Italian Lira had exactly the same history and the same Symbol!

    Reply
  • Holly Wertz

    June 19, 2018

    That was great. Thank you very much

    Reply
  • Yee Yee

    June 22, 2018

    Do you all not have 100’s in the UK

    Reply
  • Frates1

    June 23, 2018

    Plus there’s Scottish and Northern Irish bank notes and you can get Scottish £100 notes.

    Reply
  • Carolina Simm

    July 5, 2018

    very good. thanks a lot. very helpful

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    July 22, 2018

    There were also ½ new pence right but it was lasts only for 13 years

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    July 22, 2018

    Before there's not pound and two pound coin
    The first pound coin was made back 1983 ( I'm not talking with soverign coin which made of gold)
    Then the 2 pound coin was introduced on 1986 and for bi-militalic 2 pound coin was introduced on 1997

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    July 22, 2018

    Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own £100 pound note which is more rare than 50 quid

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    July 22, 2018

    20 pound note is the most counterfeited note entire the British Banknotes

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    July 22, 2018

    Both Ireland and UK was decimilised on 15th February 1971
    While Australia was switched their pounds into Dollar back in 14th February 1966 and a year later new Zealand follows the switch over

    Reply
  • hyunjin lee

    July 22, 2018

    Coins higher than crown coin was minted in gold
    The soverign the guinea
    Those are the gold
    Then all coins higher than penny are minted usually in a silver until 1947

    Reply
  • Justin Lee

    July 24, 2018

    i wish you was my teacher

    Reply
  • Brittany Gregory

    August 10, 2018

    59.99 gbs in the UK what does that mean

    Reply
  • Union Pacific

    August 21, 2018

    Cool!

    Reply
  • Trystan Farah

    August 24, 2018

    Excellent video. Very formative and I myself am British and everything is top notch!

    Reply
  • David Cummings

    August 26, 2018

    A question on thr pre decimal money … what or why was the letter "d" used with the old coinage ?

    Reply
  • peter kent

    September 13, 2018

    ten bob note

    Reply
  • Luis Lozada

    September 15, 2018

    Thanks teacher

    Reply
  • Mor Kız

    October 29, 2018

    Where is the second video?

    Reply
  • Dolan Williams

    November 2, 2018

    Thanks aunty! Very informative!

    Reply
  • Greg Maffei

    November 24, 2018

    It is interesting to me how other countries use the 1 and 2 pound coins in everyday life, such as vending machines and as bus tokens. Whenever the US has tried a 1dollar coin (e.g. Susan b Anthony ) it has failed miserably. We get rid of those as fast as we can because we have no infrastructure to use these coins. They are useless to us

    Reply
  • Hussain Iraqi

    December 11, 2018

    Thank you very much ma'am 🌸❤🌸❤🌸❤

    Reply
  • KPEC3arrival

    December 18, 2018

    Makes me think of the Supertramp lyric, "lend me fifteen p, i'm dying for a smoke"!

    Reply
  • KPEC3arrival

    December 18, 2018

    I wonder if England was on a gold standard like America was. In the 1950s, American dollars were redeemable in gold, theoretically. As inflation rose, even though gold rose in value, the fractional value was too small and we abandoned the gold standard. Supposedly, each Americal dollar is backed by fractional reserves, but conspiracy people think Ft.Knox is empty!

    Reply
  • Medium Mark

    January 1, 2019

    If a shilling is worth 12 pennies and two and a half shillings are 30 pennis, why is a half crown a 2 and a half shilling?

    Reply
  • Smart Car Ridin'

    February 14, 2019

    Thanks

    Reply
  • ian port

    March 3, 2019

    If you haven't done so yet I'd suggest a family relationships film using the Royal Family. I did this eay back in the 80s. It was fun and combined history with useful vocab. Some students got a bit confused at first "Princess Diana is the niece of Prince Philip who is married to the Queen Mother". We got there in the end!

    Reply
  • Dario Witer

    April 8, 2019

    This bit of information is quite useful for Americans and foreigners to understand should they travel to Britain for vacation or business. ☺️💵💷

    Reply
  • Josh.

    April 22, 2019

    I'm not British or anything, I'm American. But I still love learning about this stuff

    Reply
  • Nelson Mikhail

    April 30, 2019

    We want to know about how the londoners speek

    Reply
  • Sammy The Tourist

    May 11, 2019

    So nice. I am from Tanzania

    Reply
  • Dodge Chance

    May 25, 2019

    The notes £5 and £10 have been changed since

    Reply
  • Trevor Baker

    July 2, 2019

    What is the plural for pound? Is it pound or pounds?

    Reply
  • Trevor Baker

    July 2, 2019

    In Australia crust used to be used in addition to bread and dough.

    Reply
  • 이현진

    July 7, 2019

    Hello Gill, would you mind to help me cus it really won't sick out on my head how to calculate or sum up the old British Empire money system the pounds shillings and penny or £sd
    So, if I have 3 half crowns, 30 shillings, 29 penny , a Haypenny and a farthing how you will write it
    on pound
    Also, a crown is a 5 SHILLINGS worth
    Then, why half crown are worth 2/6 shillings Instead of 2/5 Shillings?
    Ta, Mate!

    Reply
  • 이현진

    July 7, 2019

    Why bank of England are no longer make 100 pound notes like what they did back in early 18th century

    Reply
  • 이현진

    July 7, 2019

    The last time when guinea, sovereign are seen on circulated was before WW1 which is during end of monarch of Queen Victoria and the beginning of his son's reign king Edward VIII
    They take them out cus people are start to hord it people taking it out from the circulation they save it
    At that time gold is more expensive and it's far from what face value of the coin
    So all those coins was melted
    There's still some in coin shop or collector like me (but I don't have those gold coins) .

    Reply
  • 이현진

    July 7, 2019

    Crown coin are rarely seen in circulation
    As well as half crown

    Reply
  • 이현진

    July 7, 2019

    If you have guinea on your pocket it's like you have a 1000 Swiss Francs, 500 euro or even 10,000 Brunei/ Singaporean Dollar on your wallet

    Reply
  • 이현진

    July 7, 2019

    Margaret Thatcher say no to Maastricht Treaty on 1992
    So Both UK and Denmark are not obligated to adopt the common currency the euro
    While Sweden had referendum and 75% of Swedish are not happy letting go their national legacy money the Krona
    So, only Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechia, Hungary are obligated to join the euro replacing them national currencies once they pass the createria

    Reply
  • subhash bajwa

    July 11, 2019

    Thanks aloooottt👍👍

    Reply
  • Gabriel Pereira Mendes

    August 3, 2019

    Excelent!

    Reply
  • Rave Station

    August 6, 2019

    Hi Gill, great video. What is your take on the new plastic £5 and £10. Man, I've tried to like them, but I just can't lol. The cotton mix paper will always be the best I think.

    Reply
  • Liz Smith

    August 9, 2019

    I noticed there is no 100 pound note

    Reply
  • Angelina Scohtum

    August 26, 2019

    Very good lesson! Thank you, teacher!

    Reply
  • Giti Shirasb

    October 6, 2019

    Thank you so much

    Reply
  • KPEC3arrival

    October 23, 2019

    Excellent video! The reason I watched this was because Andy Partridge of XTC sings in "Paper and Iron": no chicken for the Sunday carving, I'll stay for one more farthing…

    Reply
  • Marie-France Belle

    November 6, 2019

    great!

    Reply
  • Nandi Collector

    November 12, 2019

    Thank you very much for this extremely cool and informative lesson about pre decimal UK currency. Now I have a clear idea how much my UK collection is worth. 😉

    Reply
  • Billy Babu The Story teller

    November 14, 2019

    Ahh at last the penny has dropped.
    Time for me to spend a penny.
    Thank you for sharing this information much appreciated.

    Reply
  • packjim56

    November 17, 2019

    How does a sovereign figure in on the older currency?

    Reply
  • Skunky Stinkerson

    November 28, 2019

    Canada, got rid of the penny years ago. nickel = 5 cents, dime = 10 cents, quarter = 25 cents. loonie = 1 dollar, and a tooney = 2 dollars… a nickel = 5 pennies, dime = 10 pennies, quarter = 25 pennies. now that we have no penny, everything is rounded to the nearest nickel, dime whatever lol… if a product is 1 dollar and 97 cents, then it would be 1 dollar and 95 cents.. if it was 1.98 than it would be 2 dollars. 5 dollar bill = 5 loonies, or 10 dollar bill = 10 loonies or 5 toonies, 20 dollar bill, 50 dollar bill, and 100 dollar bill.

    Reply

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